Mike Madden on candidate “flip-flops”, campaign strategy, and the voters’ moods:

What this discounts, though, is how American voters may really feel about each candidate’s evolving campaign in 2008. They probably don’t want to see their candidate abandoning campaign promises once they take office — but after seven long years of a Bush administration that refused to change course until it was too late, they may see something entirely different in a leader who is not locked into the first thoughts he had on a given issue. This election may prove to be the one in which the flip-flop, as political weapon, finally fizzles. Both Obama and McCain are trying to play up their commitment to changing the country’s course. And it may be that as that course looks increasingly difficult, voters will pay the most attention to how the candidates are adapting to and planning to deal with the war or the economy, rather than punishing them for lacking George W. Bush’s dogmatism.

See? Your criticism of Obama’s vote allowing immunity for telecom companies that broke the law by spying on you wasn’t inconsistency on his part; it’s dogmatism on your part. Silly voter.

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